The Feel Good Blog

myramylove:

I don’t think I can do any of these.

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

1. When your friends ask you to hangout, and you don’t feel like it, don’t go. Don’t ever do things halfway or do something that makes you uncomfortable. With everything, give all of yourself, even the pieces you never knew existed.

2. It is okay to not know. Everyone always despises the phrase, “I don’t know” but no one tells you that it is okay to not know. The becoming is more important than the being, anyways.

3. If someone ever makes you feel less, in any way, you have every right to walk away. You have every right to cut out toxic people in your life. To close the door on people who make you feel bad about who you are or what you stand for. Friends don’t tear down, they build up.

4. Loss is always going to happen. Just like paint will always chip and rain will always fall, loss will always be part of life. No matter how much I don’t like it, or avoid it, it is going to walk my way at several times in my life. Learn to embrace it and learn to get closure.

5. Give yourself a chance. Stop saying, “I don’t think I can” or “But what if I am not able to?” and give yourself a chance. This may be cliche, but try to believe in yourself. When you get older, your knees won’t work the same and you won’t have the best memory, and you are going to wish you’d given yourself a chance years sooner.

6. Fall in love. Don’t be guarded before you fall in love. You could fall in love three times and still not find the right one, but none of it is going to make “the one” matter less. Don’t fall into that idea that your first love has to be your best love. Fall in love as many times as it naturally happens.

7. Firsts are going to be messy. First loves, first kisses, first dates, first failed tests, first college class, first time you drive a car, first time you ride a plane - first times were made to be imperfect. Just because it’s messy and all over the place, doesn’t mean it can’t be good or worthwhile.

8. You want another scoop of ice-cream? Go get it. Get three more scoops of ice-cream if that is what you want. “Fat” is not the opposite of beautiful and it is not the opposite of happy. Don’t let anyone tell you that your body type isn’t beautiful. Beauty is a social construct, create your own, become your own.

9. Let yourself be alone. Loneliness is not a bad thing. It is healthy and normal. Everyone needs to spend a good portion of their life alone. We learn who we are when we are alone; life is less crowded and more clear when we are alone.

10. If you aren’t happy where you are, change it. Quit your job, move, become a vegetarian, get a new hobby, pick up an old hobby, whatever you do - make sure it benefits you. Life is too short to not be alive, to not be passionate, and overflowing.

therareandferociousswamprabbit:

daveyoufool:

Neither Courage Wolf nor Calming Manatee were doing much to help my anxiety, but I knew they were both on to something.

So, I created Calmage Wolfatee.

<3

knuffelvos:

wear your war paint

whether it’s makeup, a band tshirt, your fandom pins, tattoos, jewelry, your favorite ripped pair of jeans, or something no one else can touch or see like your favorite song repeating like a mantra in your head, the sound of your own heartbeat, or the knowledge that you were brave enough to get out of bed today when everything else inside you said “no”

wear your war paint and kick ass

recipesforweebs:

So I know that most of you depressing motherfuckers watch about 98% anime and like 2% of everything else, and the opposite of you guys is basically my IRL friends.

Long before I tried convincing them to watch this shit like the weeb that I am, they always assumed that anime was like, Pokemon and Sailor Moon and they never really gave a shit about it.

Until, that is, I introduced them to Wolf Children.

If y’all haven’t seen Wolf Children, good. Don’t watch it. Don’t watch it unless you want to cry like a little bitch whenever you see a gif of this show. It’s fucking beautiful, holy balls.

And the food. Dang son. 

So I decided that today we gon’ learn how to make chicken kabobs with a thick, teriyaki dipping sauce. Partially because it looks hella fun to eat, and partially because I’m feeling masochistic today and I feel like eating this while crying over this beautiful fucking movie.

~

Hana’s Chicken Skewers with Thick Teriyaki Dipping Sauce
(servings: 4, one for you, and the rest for your non existent wolf husband and children)
adapted from: x

Ingredients for Chicken Skewers-

  • 1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup good olive oil
  • 1 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 tablespoon minced fresh thyme leaves
  • 1 lb boneless chicken breasts, halved and skin removed
  • you can replace the salt with your tears if you manage to cry enough into the marinade because of this depressingly beautifully amazing fuckin movie.
  • 1/2 red bell pepper
  • 1/2 yellow bell pepper
  • 1/2 green bell pepper

Ingredients for Teriyaki Dipping Sauce-

  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 5 tablespoons packed brown sugar
  • 1 -2 tablespoon honey
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1/4 cup cold water 

~

Procedure for Chicken-

  • Whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, salt, pepper, and thyme. Pour over the chicken breasts in a bowl.
  • Cover that shit and let it marinate  in the refrigerator for 6 hours or overnight. If you’re a lazy, hungry fuck, though, you can just let it marinate for like 1-2 hours.
  • Heat up a cast iron grill pan till that shit be hotter than Hana’s dead husband (I know that’s what you’re thinking, I’m rolling with it).
  • Grill the chicken breasts for at least 10 minutes on each side, until just cooked through.
  • 4 minutes before you finish grilling, add the bell pepper halves, allow it to cook along with the chicken, flipping over to allow it to heat up everywhere. If you think the peppers need more time to cook, go for it, son.
  • Cool slightly and cut the chicken diagonally in 1/2-inch-thick slices. Cut the peppers into a similar size as the chicken.
  • Skewer with wooden sticks and serve with Teriyaki Sauce.


Procedure for Teriyaki Dipping Sauce-

  • Mix everything but the cornstarch and 1/4c water in a sauce pan and begin to cook it over medium-high heat.
  • Mix cornstarch and cold water in a cup and dissolve. Add to sauce in pan.
  • Heat the mixture until the sauce thickens to your desired thickness.
  • If it gets too thick for y’all to handle, just add a bit of water, yo. No harm done.
  • Let it cool for a bit and then pour the sauce into a tall glass so you can dip your chicken skewers in it.
  • Serve with rice

~

Well punch my uncle and call me an emu we just made some delicious fuckin chicken skewers.

I’M LIKE HAPPY. BECAUSE THAT MEANS FOOD. BUT ALSO SAD BECAUSE THAT MEANS ITS NOW TIME TO SIT DOWN AND WATCH THIS BEAUTIFUL MOVIE.

SHOULD I EVEN BOTH PUTTING MAKE UP ON FOR SHITTY SELFIES? I KNOW I’LL CRY IT OFF IN LIKE 20 MINUTES ANYWAY.

Ugh. Anyway, enough about my issues, you losers go eat your delicious fucking chicken and try not to die too much during this movie.   

In case anyone is having a bad night:

camefreyan:

radiolightning:

Here is the fudgiest brownie in a mug recipe I’ve found

Here are some fun sites

Here is a master post of Adventure Time episodes and comics

Here is a master post of movies including Disney and Studio Ghibli

Here is a master post of other master posts to TV shows and movies

*tucks you in with fuzzy blanket* *pats your head*

You’ll be okay, friend <3

Do you have any advice for helping someone dealing with dysphoria? I'm cis, and I feel awful when I see my friends that have it depressed or upset because of it, and I feel useless because I don't know shit about what they're going through, so not only can I not help them, I don't even feel like I can sympathize and empathize and comfort them, and that makes me feel like a shitty friend. :(
Anonymous

sassmaster-general:

Well, what always works for me is talking it out. Be a shoulder to cry on. Be willing to listen to them. They may need to explode. They may need to sob and weep and punch a pillow. They may need to let a lot of emotions out, and that can be scary for someone who isn’t used to that sort of behavior.

Being a pillar of strength is important, but helping them find their own strength and confidence is always important. Just be there for them. Offer help when you can. Talk about things they love with them. Watch a movie with them. Do whatever you can to help them calm down and reach a better state of mind.

Distractions work wonders for things like dysphoria. If they don’t want to talk about it, make sure you’re ready with some fun ideas that can keep their minds busy! In-jokes work great for me! Once you get me laughing and thinking of other things, it’s a lot easier for me to come out of that dark, dysphoric place!

I hope that helps! ;v;