The Feel Good Blog

shrineart:

healingschemas:

DBT Self-Help Resources: Emotions List

Using an Emotions List to help Label an Emotion

Some people are more adept at labelling their emotions than others. Some people just can’t seem to name what they are currently feeling. They might say that they felt bad or upset, but pinning down what that actually means for them is more challenging. Many people walk around in this kind of emotional fog.

Unfortunately, if you don’t know what you are feeling, you can’t do much to change it. People who can name their emotions are more capable of managing them, so it is important to become more familiar with your emotions and learn to identify them.

Once you are more capable of naming your emotions, you’ll have more choices in terms of what to do with an emotion if it makes you feel uncomfortable and you would prefer to at least reduce its intensify. Many people with emotion dysregulation grow up without learning this important information, so for some people it takes a lot of time to get the hang of naming their emotions. Be patient. If you get frustrated, reframe this process as if you are learning a new language. In fact, that’s exactly what is happening: you are learning the language of emotion.

Anytime you are unable to identify the emotion you are experiencing refer to the Emotions List. Reading through it, you should be able to find a word that closely describes the emotion that you are experiencing.

This is incredibly important.

breelandwalker:

eldritchlunch:

grilledcheese4evr:

PRO TIP: watching “how it’s made” is SUCH a good way to combat an anxiety attack! There’s soothing music, a soothing narrator who’s intonation never changes (narrators never yell or change their speaking pace), it’s engaging enough to keep you occupied but doesn’t force you to think too hard!

also sometimes the narrator makes bad puns

Archive of How It’s Made Episodes on Project Free TV

spookyram:

The text is kind of small so I’m going to help out a bit.
How Long to Nap
10 - 20 Minutes: This power nap is ideal for a boost in alertness and energy, experts say. This length usually limits you to the lighter stages of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, making it easier to hit the ground running after waking up.
30 Minutes: Some studies show sleeping this long may cause sleep inertia, a hangover-like groggy feeling that lasts for up to 30 minutes after waking up, before the nap’s restorative benefits become apparent.
60 Minutes: This nap is best for improvement in remembering facts, faces, and names. It includes slow-wave sleep, the deepest type. The downside: some grogginess upon waking up.
90 Minutes: This is a full cycle of sleep, meaning the lighter and deeper stages, including REM (rapid eye movement) sleep, typically likened to the dreaming stage. This leads to improved emotional and procedural memory (i.e. riding a bike, playing the piano) and creativity. A nap of this length typically avoids sleep inertia, making it easier to wake up.
tl;dr
10 - 20 for alertness and energy,
30 for a hangover,
60 for fact memory at the price of a smaller hangover, and
90 for improved emotional and procedural memory without the hangover

spookyram:

The text is kind of small so I’m going to help out a bit.

How Long to Nap

10 - 20 Minutes: This power nap is ideal for a boost in alertness and energy, experts say. This length usually limits you to the lighter stages of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, making it easier to hit the ground running after waking up.

30 Minutes: Some studies show sleeping this long may cause sleep inertia, a hangover-like groggy feeling that lasts for up to 30 minutes after waking up, before the nap’s restorative benefits become apparent.

60 Minutes: This nap is best for improvement in remembering facts, faces, and names. It includes slow-wave sleep, the deepest type. The downside: some grogginess upon waking up.

90 Minutes: This is a full cycle of sleep, meaning the lighter and deeper stages, including REM (rapid eye movement) sleep, typically likened to the dreaming stage. This leads to improved emotional and procedural memory (i.e. riding a bike, playing the piano) and creativity. A nap of this length typically avoids sleep inertia, making it easier to wake up.

tl;dr

10 - 20 for alertness and energy,

30 for a hangover,

60 for fact memory at the price of a smaller hangover, and

90 for improved emotional and procedural memory without the hangover

charliexxx:

So. I had no idea about this app until I went into my doctor and he told me about it. 

LISTEN UP. THIS APP. THIS SHIT RIGHT HERE IS SERIOUSLY A BLESSING. ESPECIALLY TO ANYONE WITH FINANCIAL PROBLEMS (which is kind of everyone now). THIS IS NOT INSURANCE THOUGH. BUT IT WILL HELP YOU OUT. DOWNLOAD THIS APP RIGHT NOW. NO. STOP READING. DOWNLOAD IT

This app allows you to input the prescription you have, select your dose, and then find a place near you (or your own pharmacy) with the cheapest price. Then you click “get code/coupon/discount card,” show that to the pharmacist, and THERE YOU GO. SAVING YOU SOME CASH TO GET YOURSELF A WELL DESERVED DRINK, CANDY BAR, DATE MONEY, SEX TOY CASH, OR GO BUY YOURSELF A HAMSTER AND NAME HIM STARLORD WITH THE EXTRA MONEY

No, but in all seriousness. This app is saving my ass right now. 

I’m Trans* and have Fibromyalgia, and this is really making a difference already. I hope this helps out other people. We all know it fucking sucks to have to pay this much for the medication we need to function in life. 

Hello friend, are you having a bad night?
fairysharkmother:

Momma want to make sure you all stay safe and happy, so here are a list of things to do if you feel like you need to hurt yourself.
Scribble on people in magazines
Smile into a mirror
Create something- a drawing, a clay figure, write down what’s bothering you, anything- and destroy it.
Call a crisis help line. 
Befrienders.org is away to find helplines by country
Go to Blahtherapy.com
Hold an ice cube in your hand or your mouth
Rub ice on the place you used to cut
Clap hard
Snap a rubber band
Draw on yourself in marker
Blast music
Pop bubble wrap
Take a bath
Count to ten. Get louder with every number.
Braid something
Cry
…But there’s more!Here are some links:Teenhelp
Sirius Project
HelpGuide
YouthinBC
146 Things to Do
Need a distraction?Disney and Marvel Movies
Studio Ghibli Movies
MOVIES AND TV SHOWS
Remember; Momma would rather you safe and happy. Momma loves you. You are worth it. Everyone is.  Momma is so, so proud.

fairysharkmother:

Momma want to make sure you all stay safe and happy, so here are a list of things to do if you feel like you need to hurt yourself.

  • Scribble on people in magazines
  • Smile into a mirror
  • Create something- a drawing, a clay figure, write down what’s bothering you, anything- and destroy it.
  • Call a crisis help line. 
  • Befrienders.org is away to find helplines by country
  • Go to Blahtherapy.com
  • Hold an ice cube in your hand or your mouth
  • Rub ice on the place you used to cut
  • Clap hard
  • Snap a rubber band
  • Draw on yourself in marker
  • Blast music
  • Pop bubble wrap
  • Take a bath
  • Count to ten. Get louder with every number.
  • Braid something
  • Cry

…But there’s more!

Here are some links:
Teenhelp

Sirius Project

HelpGuide

YouthinBC

146 Things to Do

Need a distraction?

Disney and Marvel Movies

Studio Ghibli Movies

MOVIES AND TV SHOWS

Remember; Momma would rather you safe and happy. Momma loves you. You are worth it. Everyone is. 

 Momma is so, so proud.

Breathing and grounding exercises to help you calm down
Deep Breathing: Put your hands on your stomach and breathe in for 7 seconds hold for 5 seconds out for 10 seconds as you feel your stomach rise and fall. Keep repeating as often as you need to.
The 5-4-3-2-1 game: Out loud state 5 things you feel; 4 things you see; 3 things you smell; 2 things you hear; and one thing you smell. Repeat until you are calmer.
Physical Grounding: Sit down in a chair, with your back straight and your feet firmly planted on the ground. Feel how the ground feels under your feet, how the chair you are sitting on feels, how your body feels. Focus on the sensations from your body touching the ground and the chair.
Meditation: Lie back. Get comfortable. Close your eyes. Try to clear your mind and let all thoughts go through without paying attention to them. Acknowledge the thoughts, but don't let them gain control. While you meditate it helps to do the deep breathing exercise at the same time.